Fire Hose Manufacturing process.

ACE Fire Hose Manufacturing process

Fire Hose Manufacturing process.

ACE FIRE Hoses are manufactured in a plant that specializes in providing hose products to municipal, industrial, and forestry fire departments. Here is a typical sequence of operations used to manufacture a double jacket, rubber-lined fire hose.

Preparing the yarn
  • There are two different fiber yarns that are woven together to form a hose jacket. The yarns that run lengthwise down the hose are called warp yarns and are usually made from spun polyester or filament nylon. They form the inner and outer surfaces of the jacket and provide abrasion resistance for the hose. The yarns that are wound in a tight spiral around the circumference of the hose are called the filler yarns and are made from filament polyester. They are trapped between the crisscrossing warp yarns and provide strength to resist the internal water pressure. The spun polyester warp yarns are specially prepared by a yarn manufacturer and are shipped to the hose plant. No further preparation is needed.
  • The continuous filament polyester fibers are gathered together in a bundle of 7-15 fibers and are twisted on a twister frame to form filler yarns. The plied and twisted yarn is then wound onto a spool called a filler bobbin.
Weaving the jackets
  • The warp yarns are staged on a creel, which will feed them lengthwise down through a circular loom. Two filler bobbins with the filler yarn are put in place in the loom.
  • As the loom starts, the filler bobbins wind the filler yarn in a circle through the warp yarns. As soon as the bobbins pass, the loom crisscrosses each pair of adjacent warp yarns to trap the filler yarn between them. This weaving process continues at a high speed as the lower end of the jacket is slowly drawn down through the loom, and the bobbins continue to wrap the filler yarns around the circumference of the jacket in a tight spiral. The woven jacket is wound flat on a take-up reel.
  • The inner and outer jackets are woven separately. The inner jacket is woven to a slightly smaller diameter so that it will fit inside the outer jacket. Depending on the expected demand, several thousand feet of jacket may be woven at one time. After an inspection, the two jackets are placed in storage.
  • If the outer jacket is to be coated, it is drawn through a dip tank filled with the coating material and then passed through an oven where the coating is dried and cured.
Extruding the liner
  • Blocks of softened, sticky, uncured rubber are fed into an extruder. The extruder warms the rubber and presses it out through an opening between an inner and outer solid circular piece to form a tubular liner.
  • The rubber liner is then heated in an oven where it undergoes a chemical reaction called vulcanizing, or curing. This makes the rubber strong and pliable.
  • The cured liner passes through a machine called a rubber calendar, which forms a thin sheet of uncured rubber and wraps it around the outside of the liner.
Forming the hose
  • The jackets and liner are cut to the desired length. The inner jacket is inserted into the outer jacket, followed by the liner.
  • A steam connection is attached to each end of the assembled hose, and pressurized steam is injected into the hose. This makes the liner swell against the inner jacket and causes the thin sheet of uncured rubber to vulcanize and bond the liner to the inner jacket.
  • The metal end connections, or couplings, are attached to the hose. The outer portion of each coupling is slipped over the outer jacket and an inner ring is inserted into the rubber liner. A tool called an expansion mandrel is placed inside the hose and expands the ring. This squeezes the jackets and liner between the ring and serrations on the outer portion of the coupling to form a seal all the way around the hose.
Pressure testing the hose
  • Standards set by the National Fire Protection Association require that each length of new single jacket, rubber-lined attack hose must be pressure tested to 600 psi (41.4 bar; 4,140 kPa), but most manufacturers test to 800 psi (55.2 bar; 5,520 kPa). Subsequent to delivery, the hose is tested annually to 400 psi (27.6 bar; 2,760 kPa) by the fire department. While the hose is under pressure, it is inspected for leaks and to determine that the couplings are firmly attached.
  • After testing the hose is drained, dried, rolled, and shipped to the customer.

Brass Plated Aluminum Couplings

We use the same quality aluminum as found on fire trucks. We have decided to brass plate our couplings because, it like gold. Stay Safe and Be Prepared. Have Fun!

We do not recommend using our protects in prolonged freezing temperatures. The materials will freeze and crack.

Please review our policy's and disclaimers before purchasing,

These are professional fire fighting products. We offer this to first responders at the very best price possible.

It's in serving each other where we become free.

Thank you for your service.

 

 

 

  • Steve, Chatsworth California

    "I just finished bundling all the hose and setting up the system for the quickest possible deployment. I’m very pleased with everything and happy to have it. Thank you for all your help." 

  •  Glen, Salt Lake City, Utah

    "Dear ACE FIRE Preparedness, The valve arrived and I have attached it to the high
    pressure pump. I am quite happy Thank you for making this equipment available to our community."
     

  • Larry Jacobs, Lake Chatsworth, CA.

    "This is fire insurance in your hands. Thank you Ace Fire Preparedness. Thank you for setting up the pump. We feel better knowing we are prepared to fight the embers.